Welcome! A Place for Poetry of the Personal!

Stained glass 5 pt 11 inch no spaces

Confess your feelings of betrayal, fear, heartache or humiliation that you have experienced in your divorce or co-parenting situation.

Share a setting that you regret or a situation that may have caused anguish, misery or sorrow  for your co-parent.  Or, reveal actions that may have promoted emotional pain or unhappiness for your child.

Confessions are not limited to heartache only.  Please share heartwarming moments and happy experiences you have experienced in divorce and shared parenting too!  Perhaps, something your co-parent did or said that has enhanced your co-parenting relationship.  

Here is anopportunity to share the confessions about your divorce or co-parenting experiences. This can be something that you have told to family and friends or a private thought that has remained a secret…….until now. Focus on extreme moments of individual experiences.  

This is a place to confess what your co-parent did or said that led to your feelings of betrayal, fear or humiliation. Write about something that you enacted, a statement or a thought you expressed that caused grief for your co-parent, your child or yourself.  

We learn from others experiences and situations. Perhaps in reading these scenarios, co-parents can identify with issues they are also experiencing.   Hopefully,one can see how some actions can have long-term negative effects and cause pain for their co-parent or child!   Importantly, by reading these stories co-parents can see that they are not alone in the thoughts and feelings surrounding their divorce and co-parenting relationship.

Invitation is extended to:

  • Parents who are divorced or in the process of divorce.
  • Parents and co-parents (never married) who have children.
  • Parents who have or do not have a parenting plan in place.
  • Anyone interested in a front row seat to see the despair that divorce or co-parenting issues can have on a parent and how the actions impact the child.
Advertisements

NEW CONFESSIONS THIS WEEK!

 

NEW CONFESSIONS! 

Read all confessions at: SharedParentingConfessional.com

LIKE https://www.facebook.com/SharedParenting-Confessional-162350697643485/

Share your confession at: MyConfession@SharedParentingConfessional.com

Are Family Members Cropable?

 

Children want and need to have a relationship with BOTH parents. In this ‘artwork’ one parent is nondescript and separate from other family members. From the standpoint of the child, each family member is important.  No one is ‘crop-able’. Supporting the parent-child relationship with each parent is important to the child.

# 478, Are Family Members Cropable?

.                       

I hate Devorce

 

 A heart wrenching portrayal of parental ‘Devorce” for one child.  The red heart at eye level  of the individual stands out the most. Who is the person taking a very large knife to the ‘heart’ of the tree.  Is this a child sharing their experience of emotional hurt? Or, is this artist  depicting a parent taking a knife to the emotional heart of the child?  Numerous jagged edges appear throughout the tree branches indicating aggressiveness. What is this child artist revealing with this artwork? Is this child able to spend time with both parents? There are many questions without answers with this startling artwork. 

 

 

#566, I Hate Devorce.

Cut in Half

A large knife across the entire page sets the tone for this thought.  Perhaps,  the ransom style note indicates anonymity as the child is unable to express how they feel to either parent.  How does a child reconcile mean statements about their co-parent?  Divorce is between the parents and about the child.  Hopefully, someone will allow this child to share their emotional experiences  about parental divorce.

#565, Cut in Half

Check Out All Categories

 

Confessions available in the following categories:

A CHILD’S VIEW

ADULT CHILD OF DIVORCE (ACOD)

ADVICE: PARENT TO PARENT

CELEBS AND PARENTAL DIVORCE

FAMILY COURT

FOR GRANDPARENTS

HAPPY ENDINGS

HOLIDAYS

IMPACT ON CHILD

NARCISSISTIC TENDENCIES

PARENTAL HEARTACHE

PSYCHOLOGICAL ABUSE: CHILD

REALITY OF DIVORCE

THIS IS SHARED PARENTING

TRUE CONFESSIONS

ALL CATEGORIES

 

Counting the Days

 

An adolescent is marking the days until they turn age 18.  Does this mean more freedom? Or, the ability to make their own decisions and deciding where they want to live? What happens at that point?    Notably, Young adults still benefit from parental guidance.

#564, Counting the Days