Welcome to the Place for Poetry of the Personal!

Stained glass 5 pt 11 inch no spaces

Confess your feelings of betrayal, fear, heartache or humiliation that you have experienced in your divorce or co-parenting situation.

Share a setting that you regret or a situation that may have caused anguish, misery or sorrow  for your co-parent.  Or, reveal actions that may have promoted emotional pain or unhappiness for your child.

Confessions are not limited to heartache only.  Please share heartwarming moments and happy experiences you have experienced in divorce and shared parenting too!  Perhaps, something your co-parent did or said that has enhanced your co-parenting relationship.  

Here is anopportunity to share the confessions about your divorce or co-parenting experiences. This can be something that you have told to family and friends or a private thought that has remained a secret…….until now. Focus on extreme moments of individual experiences.  

This is a place to confess what your co-parent did or said that led to your feelings of betrayal, fear or humiliation. Write about something that you enacted, a statement or a thought you expressed that caused grief for your co-parent, your child or yourself.  

We learn from others experiences and situations. Perhaps in reading these scenarios, co-parents can identify with issues they are also experiencing.   Hopefully,one can see how some actions can have long-term negative effects and cause pain for their co-parent or child!   Importantly, by reading these stories co-parents can see that they are not alone in the thoughts and feelings surrounding their divorce and co-parenting relationship.

Invitation is extended to:

  • Parents who are divorced or in the process of divorce.
  • Parents and co-parents (never married) who have children.
  • Parents who have or do not have a parenting plan in place.
  • Anyone interested in a front row seat to see the despair that divorce or co-parenting issues can have on a parent and how the actions impact the child.
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I’m Fine…

 

Here is the painful reality of parental alienation. A parent may act as if everything is ok while they may be experiencing grief and turmoil. Numerous support groups are available for parents and family  members who are unable to see their child due to custody and divorce matters.

#504, I’m Fine…

The Happy Mask

 

Emotional abuse during childhood has long-term ramifications.  An adult child shares a glimpse into their emotional world.  The child learns at an early age to put aside their own desires to please their parent. This is at the expense of their own emotional needs, feelings and wants. This emotional abuse may revealed in all future relationships.

 

#503, The Happy Mask

Two

 

This is a colorful presentation of divorce. The black backdrop adds to the drama and emotional impact. A split heart with two parents who both seem distraught with tears. Two children are floating as if being tossed from the small house in between them. This artwork is used to show a child how divorce may feel. Sadly, the ridges on each side of the heart, and both children without a strong attachment to anything are realistic.  

#502, Two

 

 

Recipe for Disaster!

 

The perfect mix! Creating an  individual with narcissistic tendencies is a special recipe. One must have the perfect background growing up and the right person to support their needs. Ingredients may be substituted with any of the following: Self-centered need for adoration, adulation and attention. This recipe is full-proof and long-lasting. Shelf-life guaranteed.

#501, Recipe for Disaster!

Truth?

 

The stories the members tell about how the family works, both in childhood and in adulthood are firmly established and become the “truth. With an individual who has narcissistic tendencies there is only one side to the story. This is frustrating for co-parents and confusing for the child. Children learn about relationships by observing parental interactions. Continual exposure to untruths and lack of interest in another individuals’ experience may be devastating for the child. 

#500, Truth?

 

Who is the Parent?

 

A parentified child of divorce sacrifices their needs to care for the parent and the parent gives up their role to one or more of their children. A parentified child expresses ‘concern’ for the parent while the healthy emotional bond is absent. In essence, the child is not allowed to be a child. This dynamic has long-term negative consequences for the child and will be realized in interpersonal and intrapersonal relationships throughout the life of the child.

#499, Who is the Parent?